After the huge success of her first album for Alpha, Crazy Girl Crazy (Alpha 293), which received a Grammy Award, a JUNO Classical Award in Canada, the Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik, FFFF in Télérama and DIAMANT in Opéra Magazine and was BBC Music Magazine CD of the Month, Barbara Hannigan is back with her long-time collaborator, the Dutch pianist and great interpreter of twentieth-century music Reinbert de Leeuw, for a recital exploring the roots of modern music, with the composers who left their mark on the turn of the twentieth century: Hugo Wolf (Mignon Lieder), Arnold Schoenberg (Vier Lieder op.2), Anton Webern (Fünf Lieder nach Gedichten von R. Dehmel), Alexander Zemlinsky (selected lieder), Alma Mahler (Die stille Nacht etc.) and Alban Berg (Sieben frühe Lieder). From what has been called the Second Viennese School, an incredible mix of musicians, painters, writers and other artists frequenting salons and cafés, a completely new musical language was born. Barbara Hannigan is especially fond of this repertory and has long championed it. Of course, we think of Berg and his unforgettable Lulu: ‘The artist who sings’, as journalists often like to describe her, embodies this music with her legendary dramatic sense, making each of these lieder a story in itself, even a mini-opera . . .

ffff Télérama award Le choix de France Musique award

"as usual with Hannigan, there’s some compelling, fascinating singing here"
Gramophone
"Hannigan's luminous voice perfectly suits this music. She conveys the uneasy, almost unhinged feel of the fin de siecle not only in her lyric singing, but also in her crooning, swooping, sliding, whispering and weeping."
BBC Music Magazine
"Inhabited with such clarity and expressive intensity by Barbara Hannigan and pianist Reinbert De Leeuw, their previous project of Eric Satie showed us how well they work together."
BBC Radio 3
"Beautiful late-Romantic Lieder, superbly performed by Hannigan and Leeuw to make this a special album. (Album of the year)"
MusicWeb International
"No-one could accuse the magnetic Canadian soprano of lacking in sensuality: her supple, slender soprano has its own unique colour-palette (she specialises in shimmery golds and creams which put me in mind of Gustav Klimt), and she’s supremely alive to the strange beauty of the poetry…Sheer voluptuous delight from start to finish."
Presto Classical
"Hannigan and de Leeuw command this mysterious, disturbingly shaded and sensual music with aptly teasing restraint."
Sunday Times
"Is there nothing that Barbara Hannigan cannot do? Apart from being the world’s best, most persuasive singer of contemporary music, the Canadian soprano has recently become a nifty conductor, almost capable of displaying both skills at once."
The Times
"A whole expressive world seems perfectly evoked"
The Guardian
"...this disc is enticing in a very personal way…Hannigan’s hypnotic singing makes fin de siècle Vienna feel like a city of dreams. Freud would be proud of her."
The Financial Times
"The force of nature that is Barbara Hannigan – performer, conductor, mentor, director – pauses long enough to provide us with one of the most delicious recitals of the year."
Opera Now
"Hannigan, 47 and fearless, has just the right blend of solemnity and vivacity for this oversexed epoch. I have never heard the Schoenberg songs better sung."
Norman Lebrecht
"The force of nature that is Barbara Hannigan – performer, conductor, mentor, director – pauses long enough to provide us with one of the most delicious recitals of the year."
Opera Now, November 2018
"Hannigan’s hypnotic singing makes fin de siècle Vienna feel like a city of dreams. Freud would be proud of her."
The Financial Times, 5 October 2018
"Hannigan’s recital focuses on a repertoire that reflects the decaying of certainties as the First World War loomed. Collections by Schoenberg (Four Songs, Op 2), Berg (Seven Early Songs) and Webern (the 1908 Dehmel settings) open the programme, but equally impressive are examples by Zemlinsky, Alma Mahler and Wolf. Hannigan and de Leeuw command this mysterious, disturbingly shaded and sensual music with aptly teasing restraint."
Sunday Times, 15 September 2018