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Time and Eternity. Always in search of powerful musical experiences, the violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja and Camerata Bern – of which she has just taken over the artistic direction –here juxtapose Hartmann’s Concerto funebre, composed in 1939 to express his indignation at the Nazis’ terror, and the Polyptyque for violin and orchestra that Frank Martin wrote in 1973 for Yehudi Menuhin, a work inspired by six scenes from the Passion of Christ painted by Duccio di Buoninsegna around 1310. The Kyrie from Machaut’s Messe de Nostre Dame, composed half a century after the altarpiece and heard here in an arrangement for strings, is interspersed between the movements, along with Bach chorales, ‘as an invocation of eternal consolation’. A Polish folksinger interprets the Jewish song ‘Eliyahu hanavi’, which expresses the hope of salvation and which Hartmann quotes in his concerto. Six hundred years of music to ‘make the victims’ voices heard’, says Patricia Kopatchinskaja. The album opens with Kol Nidrei by John Zorn (born 1953), in response to the eponymous prayer spoken by a representative of the Jewish community. A Catholic priest and an Orthodox priest also say a short prayer.

"Patricia Kopatchinskaja's new disc with the Camera Bern is another of the violinist’s thoughtful and eclectic mix-ups."
The Guardian
"None of this jumbling-up affects PatKop’s extraordinary skills, her willingness to embrace emotional extremes or the flair of her Camerata companions."
The Times
"It’s a cathartic experience from an artist who always offers something more."
The Guardian
"The effect is to deepen the listener’s experience of human suffering redeemed by faith and the beauty of music. Kopatchinskaja imagines a music that penetrates into the human condition, using masterpieces, folksongs, speech, and otherworldly expressions that penetrate the heart. Her new release comes as close to renewing the joy of music as any I can think of."
Fanfare
"The result is the most visceral version of Hartmann’s work I know."
Fanfare